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Applications open for 3rd Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship Programme

The KAC Global Tobacco Harm Reduction (THR) Scholarship Programme 2020 is now open for applications. Proposals to build capacity within the field are encouraged from anyone, anywhere, working in, or hoping to enter THR. Relevant disciplines include public health, research, medicine, science, consumer involvement, journalism, communications and film-making. Scholars participate in a bespoke programme, receive expert mentoring and up to $10,000 to complete their project. The initiative is funded by a grant from the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World; the programme is independently designed and run by KAC. Applications should be received by 14 January 2020.
For more information, visit https://scholarships.kachange.eu/

Regulate instead of ban, say vape groups

Two advocacy groups have rejected a proposed blanket ban on electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and vaping, saying regulations and enforcement should be the appropriate response to lingering health concerns. “We note that the NGOs are concerned with the use of vape among those below 18 years old and the recent cases in the US where the products have been abused through drug use. “This is exactly why regulations have to be introduced to ensure there are controls to prevent children from having access to the products and that the products are regulated with standards […]

28 September, 2019.
sg.news.yahoo.com


Snus Can Save People From Cigarettes. Just Ask Sweden.

Tuesday was an important day for public health in the U.S. For the first time ever, the Food and Drug Administration ruled that a company will be allowed to advertise its tobacco products as less harmful than cigarettes. As momentous as this decision is — and it is momentous — the public health community was not exactly cheering the news. In fact, it was downright grumpy about the whole thing.

24 October, 2019

bloomberg.com


Global Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarships 

Are you interested in tobacco harm reduction and you want to develop your interest and yourself? Global Tobacco Harm Reduction scholarships are now open! Click on this link to apply; https://scholarships.kachange.eu/

09 October, 2019.
https://scholarships.kachange.eu/


CDC Finally Admits that Black Market THC Vape Carts are a Major Culprit in Respiratory Disease Outbreak

The CDC has finally admitted that black market THC vape carts are a major culprit in the respiratory disease outbreak that has affected 805 people and resulted in 13 deaths. Instead of continuing to emphasize that “no single product” is linked to all the cases, the CDC clearly stated yesterday that “THC is the most prominent link across patients” and the agency changed its warning to specifically mention THC: “While this investigation is ongoing, CDC recommends that persons consider refraining from using e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly those containing THC.” Click to read more…
 

Vaping criticism will only protect cigarette trade, leading NZ academic says

A New Zealand academic has challenged the World Health Organisation’s criticism that e-cigarettes are just as harmful as smoking, arguing that the approach will only protect the cigarette trade and do more harm than good. The WHO recently warned that e-cigarettes are harmful to people’s health as they contain addictive liquids with toxic substances. The organisation also says the devices are opening the door to addiction for youth, blaming the aggressive push for vaping products from big tobacco over the past few years.

2 September, 2019
tvnz.co.nz


Patient’s death could be first in US linked to vaping, officials say

US health officials are reporting what could be the country’s first death linked to vaping. The officials said on Friday that an adult patient in Illinois, who contracted a serious lung disease after vaping, had died and that they considered it the first death in the US linked to e-cigarettes. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) received the report of the death on Thursday, the chief medical officer, Dr Jennifer Layden, said.

26 August, 2019
theguardian.com